Thursday, 17 September 2015

Apps Used in York's Archaeology Data Service

Following a short presentation about online apps we're looking at at York, Michael Charno got in touch and said..


The following are apps that we use at the Archaeology Data Service:

* Asana [https://asana.com/]: Its a really simple task management app
that enables task allocation, commenting, prioritising, creating
deadlines, etc. Its free for use amongst 10 colleagues, so we've
been fine with it so far.
* New Relic [http://newrelic.com/]: Systems analytics software for
understanding where problems exist in servers/web
applications/interfaces. Obviously more useful for people managing
servers or web applications, so might not be widely useful. However
if the university was going to get a license we'd happily join in!
* Slack [https://slack.com/]: We used the free version but quit after
we found ourselves moving to the 10,000 message limit quickly and
didn't want to purchase a license. We haven't replaced it, but would
certainly start using it again if the university was going to get it.



It's not the first time someone at York has mentioned Asana to me. I went to the tool, logged in with my York account and it tells me that 277 York members are already there (including Dan and Paul from the Web Office). After a quick look, I do like the simplicity of Asana.

Slack is like a twitter for your team application. Anyone else tried it or like it?

2 comments:

  1. I'm a bit of an Asana addict - I use it all day, every day at work and use it outside the office too. For me it's indispensable, but although everyone else in the team does use it I think we'd all acknowledge that it's not working as smoothly as it could. I'm not sure if that's because of the tool (it's simple on the surface, but has a bit of a learning curve to get the best out of it) or our process, but I have been mulling over a shift to something more visual like Trello or Flow.

    And we've been using Slack for a while too. 21 members of our wider team are registered, but only about half are active. I'd describe it as more like HipChat than Twitter - the emphasis is very much on live chat and alerts. We really like it.

    Are there slides or notes from the presentation about apps under consideration? I'd be interested in hearing more.

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  2. There are, but they're so brief to be useless. I'll send you the link though.

    Coffee sometime soon?

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